Sawyer & Huck - Netflix

Posted on Mon 17 June 2019 in netflix

Sawyer & Huck is described as a reimagining of the iconic characters of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn as adults in modern day America at a time that harkens back to the racial and class divides that inspired Mark Twain's books. After a murder case brings them together in St. Louis, Tom Sawyer hires his previously estranged boyhood friend Huck Finn as an investigator for his foundering one-man legal firm and together they take on cases for people who don't have anywhere else to turn.

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: None

Sawyer & Huck - Huckleberry Finn - Netflix

Huckleberry “Huck” Finn is a fictional character created by Mark Twain who first appeared in the book The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and is the protagonist and narrator of its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He is 12 or 13 years old during the former and a year older (“thirteen or fourteen or along there,” Chapter 17) at the time of the latter. Huck also narrates Tom Sawyer Abroad and Tom Sawyer, Detective, two shorter sequels to the first two books.

Sawyer & Huck - Characterization - Netflix

Huckleberry “Huck” Finn is the son of the town's vagrant drunkard, “Pap” Finn. Sleeping on doorsteps when the weather is fair, in empty hogsheads during storms, and living off of what he receives from others, Huck lives the life of a destitute vagabond. The author metaphorically names him “the juvenile pariah of the village” and describes Huck as “idle, and lawless, and vulgar, and bad,” qualities for which he was admired by all the children in the village, although their mothers “cordially hated and dreaded” him. Huck is an archetypal innocent, able to discover the “right” thing to do despite the prevailing theology and prejudiced mentality of the South of that era. The best example of this is his decision to help Jim escape slavery, even though he believes he will go to hell for it (see Christian views on slavery). His appearance is described in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. He wears the clothes of full-grown men which he probably received as charity, and as Twain describes him, “he was fluttering with rags.” He has a torn broken hat and his trousers are supported with only one suspender. Even Tom Sawyer, the St. Petersburg hamlet boys' leader sees him as “the banished Romantic.” Tom's Aunt Polly calls Huck a “poor motherless thing.” Huck confesses to Tom in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer that he remembers his mother and his parents' relentless fighting that only stopped when she died. Huck has a carefree life free from societal norms or rules, stealing watermelons and chickens and “borrowing” boats and cigars. Due to his unconventional childhood, Huck has received almost no education. At the end of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Huck is adopted by the Widow Douglas, who sends him to school in return for his saving her life. In the course of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn he learns enough to be literate and even reads books for entertainment when there isn't anything else to do. His knowledge of history as related to Jim is wildly inaccurate, but it is not specified if he is being wrong on purpose as a joke on Jim. In Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, the sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, the Widow attempts to “sivilize” (sic) the newly wealthy Huck. Huck's father takes him from her, but Huck manages to fake his own death and escape to Jackson's Island, where he coincidentally meets up with Jim, a slave who was owned by the Widow Douglas' sister, Miss Watson. Jim is running away because he overheard Miss Watson planning to “sell him South” for eight hundred dollars. Jim wants to escape to Ohio, where he can find work to eventually buy his family's freedom. Huck and Jim take a raft down the Mississippi River in hopes of finding freedom from slavery for Jim and freedom from Pap for Huck. Their adventures together, along with Huck's solo adventures, comprise the core of the book. In the end, however, Jim gains his freedom through Miss Watson's death, as she freed him in her will. Pap, it is revealed, has died in Huck's absence, and although he could safely return to St. Petersburg, Huck plans to flee west to Indian Territory. In Tom Sawyer Abroad and Tom Sawyer, Detective, the sequels to Huck Finn, however, Huck is living in St. Petersburg again after the events of his eponymous novel. In Abroad, Huck joins Tom and Jim for a wild, fanciful balloon ride that takes them overseas. In Detective, which occurs about a year after the events of Huck Finn, Huck helps Tom solve a murder mystery.

Sawyer & Huck - References - Netflix