Perspectives - Netflix

Posted on Thu 30 May 2019 in netflix

The Perspectives documentary strand brings together powerful stories and unique insights into the arts from a range of well-known figures. Now in its fifth series, the strand will encompass six films from a rich variety of distinctive individuals offering their take on subjects for which they have a personal enthusiasm and fascination.

Perspectives - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: To Be Determined

Runtime: 45 minutes

Premier: 2011-04-24

Perspectives - Koko (gorilla) - Netflix

Hanabiko “Koko” (July 4, 1971 – June 19, 2018) was a female western lowland gorilla who was known for having learned a large number of hand signs from a modified version of American Sign Language (ASL). Koko was born at the San Francisco Zoo and lived most of her life in Woodside, California, at The Gorilla Foundation's preserve in the Santa Cruz Mountains. The name “Hanabiko” (花火子), lit. “fireworks child,” is of Japanese origin and is a reference to her date of birth, the Fourth of July. Koko gained public attention upon a report of her having adopted a kitten as a pet and creating a name for him. Her instructor and caregiver, Francine Patterson, reported that Koko was able to understand more than 1,000 signs of what Patterson calls “Gorilla Sign Language” (GSL). In contrast to other experiments attempting to teach sign language to non-human primates, Patterson simultaneously exposed Koko to spoken English from an early age. It was reported that Koko understood approximately 2,000 words of spoken English, in addition to the signs. Koko's life and learning process has been described by Patterson and various collaborators in a number of books, peer-reviewed scientific articles, and on a website. As with other great-ape language experiments, the extent to which Koko mastered and demonstrated language through the use of these signs is disputed. It is generally accepted that she did not use syntax or grammar, and that her use of language did not exceed that of a young human child. However, she scored between 70 and 95 on various IQ scales, and experts, including Mary Lee Jensvold, claim that “Koko...[used] language the same way people do.”

Perspectives - Pets - Netflix

Researchers at The Gorilla Foundation said that Koko asked for a cat for Christmas in 1983. Ron Cohn, a biologist with the foundation, explained to the Los Angeles Times that when she was given a lifelike stuffed animal, she was less than satisfied. She did not play with it and continued to sign “sad”. So on her birthday in July 1984, she was able to choose a kitten from a litter of abandoned kittens. Koko selected a gray male Manx and named him “All Ball”. Penny Patterson, who had custody of Koko and who had organized The Gorilla Foundation, wrote that Koko cared for the kitten as if it were a baby gorilla. Researchers said that she tried to nurse All Ball and was very gentle and loving. They believed that Koko's nurturing of the kitten and the skills she gained through playing with dolls would be helpful in Koko's learning how to nurture an offspring. In December 1984, All Ball escaped from Koko's cage and was hit and killed by a car. Later, Patterson said that when she signed to Koko that All Ball had been killed, Koko signed “Bad, sad, bad” and “Frown, cry, frown, sad”. Patterson also reported later hearing Koko making a sound similar to human weeping. In 1985, Koko was allowed to pick out two new kittens from a litter to be her companions. The animals she chose, she named “Lipstick” and “Smoky”, were also Manxes. Koko picked the name after seeing the tiny orange Manx for the first time. When her trainer asked the meaning of the name, Koko answered, Lips lipstick. To celebrate her birthday in July 2015, Koko was presented another litter of kittens. Picking two, she named them Miss Black and Miss Grey.

Perspectives - References - Netflix