Friday Night Tykes - Netflix

Posted on Thu 30 May 2019 in netflix

After two explosive seasons, Esquire Network's hit documentary series Friday Night Tykes returns to San Antonio, TX for a third season on Tuesday, January 19 at 9/8c. The series that sparked a national debate will continue the conversation with 10 episodes ordered following one of the most competitive youth football leagues in America. With exclusive access to the 10 and 11-year-old division of the Texas Youth Football Association (TYFA), viewers get an authentic look at the making of football's next generation of professional superstars as the series digs deep into controversial hot topics that are prevalent in today's media. With no size or weight limit for its players, TYFA, an independent youth football league places children in the center of the firestorm. FRIDAY NIGHT TYKES addresses serious questions about youth sports and specifically as they relate to parenting and safety. How hard should we truly push our kids? Is the pressure too much for a child? What do we hope to achieve? Is this sport safe for young children? The groundbreaking series doesn't shy away from tackling the controversial questions at the heart of every All-American football family. Parents and coaches share insight into why they believe the sport is important, what motivates them, and what lessons they feel that the children learn from their discipline and dedication.

Friday Night Tykes - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2014-01-14

Friday Night Tykes - Tom and Jerry - Netflix

Tom and Jerry is an American animated series of short films created in 1940 by William Hanna and Joseph Barbera. It centers on a rivalry between its two title characters, Tom, a cat, and Jerry, a mouse, and many recurring characters, based around slapstick comedy. In its original run, Hanna and Barbera produced 114 Tom and Jerry shorts for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer from 1940 to 1958. During this time, they won seven Academy Awards for Animated Short Film, tying for first place with Walt Disney's Silly Symphonies with the most awards in the category. After the MGM cartoon studio closed in 1957, MGM revived the series with Gene Deitch directing an additional 13 Tom and Jerry shorts for Rembrandt Films from 1961 to 1962. Tom and Jerry then became the highest-grossing animated short film series of that time, overtaking Looney Tunes. Chuck Jones then produced another 34 shorts with Sib Tower 12 Productions between 1963 and 1967. Three more shorts were produced, The Mansion Cat in 2001, The Karate Guard in 2005, and A Fundraising Adventure in 2014, making a total of 164 shorts. A number of spin-offs have been made, including the television series The Tom and Jerry Show (1975), The Tom and Jerry Comedy Show (1980–82), Tom and Jerry Kids (1990–93), Tom and Jerry Tales (2006–08), and The Tom and Jerry Show (2014–present). The first feature-length film based on the series, Tom and Jerry: The Movie, was released in 1992, and 13 direct-to-video films have been produced since 2002.

Friday Night Tykes - Gene Deitch era (1961–62) - Netflix

In 1961, MGM revived the Tom and Jerry franchise, and contracted European animation studio Rembrandt Films to produce 13 Tom and Jerry shorts in Prague, Czechoslovakia. All were directed by Gene Deitch and produced by William L. Snyder. Deitch himself wrote most of the cartoons, with occasional assistance from Larz Bourne and Eli Bauer. Stěpan Koniček provided the musical score for the Deitch shorts. Sound effects were produced by Tod Dockstader. The majority of vocal effects and voices in Deitch's films were provided by Allen Swift. Deitch states that, being a “UPA man”, he was not a fan of the Tom and Jerry cartoons, thinking they were “needlessly violent”. However, after being assigned to work on the series, he quickly realized that “nobody took [the violence] seriously”, and it was merely “a parody of exaggerated human emotions”. He also came to see what he perceived as the “biblical roots” in Tom and Jerry's conflict, similar to David and Goliath, stating “That's where we feel a connection to these cartoons: the little guy can win (or at least survive) to fight another day.” Since the Deitch/Snyder team had seen only a handful of the original Tom and Jerry shorts, and since the team produced their cartoons on a tighter budget of $10,000, the resulting films were considered surrealist in nature, though this was not Deitch's intention. The animation was limited and jerky in movement, compared to the more fluid Hanna-Barbera shorts. Background art was done in a more simplistic, angular, Art Deco-esque style. The soundtracks featured sparse and echoic electronic music, futuristic sound effects, heavy reverb, and dialogue that was mumbled rather than spoken. According to Jen Nessel of The New York Times, “The Czech style had nothing in common with these gag-driven cartoons.” Whereas Hanna-Barbera's shorts generally took place in and outside of a house, Deitch's shorts opted for more exotic locations, such as a 19th-century whaling ship, the jungles of Nairobi, an Ancient Greek acropolis, or the Wild West. In addition, Mammy Two-Shoes was replaced as Tom's owner by Clint Clobber, a bald, overweight, short-tempered, middle-aged white man who was also much more brutal and violent in punishing Tom's actions as compared to previous owners, by beating and thrashing Tom repeatedly, stomping on his hand, searing his head with a grill, forcing him to drink an entire carbonated beverage, slamming his fingers with a lunchbox lid and even wrapping a shotgun over his head and firing it. To avoid being linked to Communism, Deitch romanized the Czech names of his crew in the opening credits of the shorts (e.g. Stêpan Koniček became “Steven Konichek” and Vaclav Lidl became “Victor Little”). In addition, these shorts are among the few Tom and Jerry cartoons not to carry the “Made In Hollywood, U.S.A.” phrase on the end title card; due to Deitch's studio being behind the Iron Curtain, the production studio's location is omitted entirely on it. After the 13 shorts were completed, Joe Vogel, the head of production, was fired from MGM. Vogel had approved of Deitch and his team's work, but MGM decided not to renew their contract after Vogel's departure. The final of the 13 shorts, Carmen Get It!, was released on December 21, 1962. Deitch's shorts were commercial successes. In 1961, the Tom and Jerry series became the highest-grossing animated short film series of that time, dethroning Looney Tunes, which had held the position for 16 years; this success was repeated once more in 1962. However, unlike the Hanna-Barbera shorts, none of Deitch's films were nominated for nor did they win an Academy Award. In retrospect, these shorts are often considered the worst of the Tom and Jerry theatrical output. Deitch stated that due to his team's inexperience as well as their low budget, he “hardly had a chance to succeed”, and “well understand[s] the negative reactions” to his shorts. He believes “They could all have been better animated – truer to the characters – but our T&Js were produced in the early 1960s, near the beginning of my presence here, over a half-century ago as I write this!” Despite the criticism, some fans wrote positive letters to Deitch, stating that his Tom and Jerry shorts were their personal favorites due to their quirky and surreal nature. The shorts were released on DVD in 2015 in Tom and Jerry: The Gene Deitch Collection.

Friday Night Tykes - References - Netflix